31 October 2014
Home Page About Us Services Publications Links Forum
VIEWS
TACY'S MEMO
Opinion
Analysis
NEWS
Mining & Exploration
Rough Trade
Polished Wholesale & Manufacturing
Retail
Governmental
Labs & Trade and Industry Bodies
Branding & Marketing
Legal
Financial
Diamond Pipeline
Statistics
ARCHIVE NEWS - PRE 2008
People
Regional Issues
Created Diamonds
Civil Society
Ethics
Development Issues
Conflict Diamonds
Auctions
Kimberley Process
DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE BRIEFS
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2014
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2013
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2012
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2011
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2010
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2009
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2008
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2007
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2006
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2005
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2004
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2003
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2002
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2001
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2000
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1999
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1998
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1997
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1996
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1995
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1994
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1990
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1989
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1988
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1987
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1986
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1985
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1984
TACY RESEARCH
Tacy's Reports
Tacy's Research
Tacy's Presentations
RESOURCE LIBRARY
Company Reports
Kimberley Process
NGO Reports
Government Reports
Conflict Diamonds
Producer Marketing Documentation
Trade Organization Guidance
Supplier of Choice
LEGAL
Laws and Regulations
Court Documents
Anti-Money Laundering
Best Practice Principles
Compliance
Competition
Banking
FINANCE
Basel II
Compliance
Decisions
PICTURES
Botswana
De Beers Archive Pictures
Conference Photos
India
Zimbabwe
SITE MAP
MY ARTICLES
created by CyberServe
 Email this      Printer-Friendly Format       Respond to this Article
CAMEROON, CHAD TIGHTEN BORDERS TO PREVENT FLOW OF CAR DIAMONDS
02 April 2014

Cameroon and Chad are making efforts to tighten border security to stop the illegal flow of rough diamonds said to be coming from neighboring Central African Republic (CAR), where armed Christian and Muslim groups may be using the funds from the diamonds to continue to wage war against each other.

Cameroon's mining minister Emmanuel Mbonde told the Voice of America that his government has taken measures to address the growing problem, including deploying more border staff to identify all diamonds coming into and leaving the country to assure that they are Kimberly Process-certified.

Cameroon was admitted to the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) in August 2012. Meanwhile, CAR was temporarily suspended from the scheme last May, until further review.  In the KP's final communique from its November 2013 Plenary in South Africa, it acknowledged that the security conditions in CAR are not conducive for organizing a Review Mission and do not provide guarantees for preserving the integrity of the chain of custody of diamonds. At that time, the Plenary requested the KP Chair to liaise on a continuous basis with the United Nations in assessing the situation on the ground, and specifically called on Cameroon, the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Repbulic of Congo to continue sharing their export data and pictures of rough diamond shipments on a monthly basis.

"If it is established that diamonds are actually leaving Central Africa [Republic], entering the commercial circuit through Cameroon, Cameroon will be suspended just like Central African Republic. That is why there is need for sub-regional consultations. How do we make sure that diamonds do not really contribute to fuel conflicts," Jaff Napoleon, a member of the KPCS civil society, told the VOA.

Napoleon also told VOA that Chad, not a KPCS member, is aware that the international community will impose sanctions if rough diamonds smuggled from CAR are allowed to pass through its territory.

The conflict in CAR began 15 months ago, with Muslim fighters and Christian groups attacking each other. The United Nations and humanitarian agencies report that more than 1,000 people have been killed and one million others have been displaced by the violence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Back»