22 April 2018
Home Page About Us Services Publications Links
VIEWS
TACY'S MEMO
Opinion
Analysis
NEWS
Mining & Exploration
Rough Trade
Polished Wholesale & Manufacturing
Retail
Governmental
Labs & Trade and Industry Bodies
Branding & Marketing
Legal
Financial
Diamond Pipeline
Statistics
ARCHIVE NEWS - PRE 2008
People
Regional Issues
Created Diamonds
Civil Society
Ethics
Development Issues
Conflict Diamonds
Auctions
Kimberley Process
DIAMOND INTELLIGENCE BRIEFS
Diamond Intelligence Briefing 2017
Diamond Intelligence Briefing 2016
Diamond Intelligence Briefing 2015
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2015
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2014
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2013
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2012
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2011
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2010
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2009
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2008
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2007
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2006
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2005
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2004
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2003
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2002
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2001
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 2000
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1999
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1998
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1997
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1996
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1995
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1994
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1993
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1992
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1991
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1990
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1989
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1988
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1987
Diamond lntelligence Briefs 1986
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1985
Diamond Intelligence Briefs 1984
TACY RESEARCH
Tacy's Reports
Tacy's Research
Tacy's Presentations
RESOURCE LIBRARY
Company Reports
Kimberley Process
NGO Reports
Government Reports
Conflict Diamonds
Producer Marketing Documentation
Trade Organization Guidance
Supplier of Choice
Legal Issues
LEGAL
Laws and Regulations
Court Documents
Anti-Money Laundering
Best Practice Principles
Compliance
Competition
Banking
FINANCE
Basel II
Compliance
Decisions
PICTURES
Botswana
De Beers Archive Pictures
Conference Photos
India
Zimbabwe
SITE MAP
MY ARTICLES
created by CyberServe
 Email this      Printer-Friendly Format    
UN: IVORY COAST EX-REBEL IN BREACH OF DIAMOND EXPORT BAN
24 April 2014

A senior Ivory Coast army officer is violating a rough diamond export embargo and may be using profits to buy arms, reports Reuters, citing United Nations (UN) experts. These findings come amid government efforts to have the UN ban lifted.

Last year, the UN Security Council said it would review the country's rough diamond export ban in line with the Ivory Coast's progress towards compliance with the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS). At its November plenary in Johannesburg, the KPCS recognized that Ivory Coast had, indeed, fulfilled the KPCS minimum requirements "as possibly could be achieved under the UN embargo."

After Ivory Coast's 2002-2003 civil war, the UN Security Council adopted a resolution in November 2004 to impose various sanctions on the country, including a ban on its rough diamond exports. A second civil war erupted in 2011 after the country's then-president, Laurent Gbagbo, refused to concede defeat upon losing the 2010 presidential election to Alasanne Ouattara. In May 2013, the Security Council unanimously voted to extend for another year its embargo on rough diamond exports from Ivory Coast, among other sanctions. They remain in effect until the end of this month.

In Breach of Diamond Export Ban?

However, UN experts, in charge of monitoring compliance with the sanctions regime including an arms embargo, have issued a report this week asserting that diamonds are being exported from Ivory Coast in violation of the ban, Reuters reports.

The UN experts have reportedly identified the principal diamond buyer in Seguela - one of the country's two main diamond-mining areas - as a Malian national named Sekou Niangadou, who described to the UN experts how he circumvented the KPCS by sending rough diamonds to offices in Guinea and Liberia to obtain certificates of origin there, notes the news source.

The UN experts found that, in order to operate in diamond areas, Niangadou's network made cash payments to two army officers loyal to Colonel Issiaka Ouattara, whose alias is Wattao, the deputy commander of Ivory Coast's elite Republican Guard. Wattao was a senior commander in the New Forces, which launched a rebellion in 2002 and backed President Alassane Ouattara during the 2011 war.

Reuters cites the UN experts as saying that there was "strong evidence" indicating money from diamond trafficking was being used to support elements within the army loyal to Wattao. However, a communications officer for Wattao told Reuters that the colonel declined to comment on the allegations.

A previous report by the UN experts published in October estimated the annual value of the country's illicit diamond trade to be between US$12 million and US$23 million. Before the embargo, Ivory Coast is said to have produced about 300,000 carats of diamonds a year worth about US$25 million.

   Back»